Tag Archives: UC Santa Cruz

Keep Your Heart Strong: An interview with Kati Teague about healing from the Prison Industrial Complex through art and organizing

kati3While teaching at UC Santa Cruz, I worked with three young artists whose work addresses policing, state violence, and creative forms of resistance to the Prison Industrial Complex.

In a three-part miniseries, I’ve interviewed each of these recent graduates about their work, how they became politicized, what they believe is the power of political artwork, and the various issues they address.

In the second part of this mini-series, I interview Kati Teague about her experience of her mother’s incarceration and the ways she has learned how to heal through making art and organizing against the Prison Industrial Complex. Kati’s body of work, “Have You Seen My Mother,” reckons with her mother’s abrupt and forced removal from her adolescence as she spent two years in prison at the Central California Women’s Facility. After attending a statewide protest at the site of this prison, 11 years later, Kati began to understand her individual experience in a much greater context of communities and families disrupted by incarceration and fighting for their loved ones inside and against this invisible punishing machine.

You can read the interview in full here.

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Where the Silence Is: An interview with Noah Miska about the Pelican Bay Hunger Strike

noah_longshot2While teaching at UC Santa Cruz, I worked with three young artists whose work addresses policing, state violence, and creative forms of resistance to the Prison Industrial Complex.

In a three-part miniseries, I’ve interviewed each of these recent graduates about their work, how they became politicized, what they believe is the power of political artwork, and the various issues they address. The first of these interviews is with Noah Miska, whose untitled multimedia installation educates viewers about the Pelican Bay Hunger Strike and invites them to get involved in supporting people in prison. It was created for the 2013 Irwin Scholars Award Show, a group show recognizing twelve emerging artists and graduating seniors at UC Santa Cruz’s Sesnon Gallery. This article is cross-posted on Organizing Upgrade and Open Space.

Art 148: Winter Quarter 2011 Open Studios

Open Studios at UC Santa Cruz is coming up! The art department will open its doors to visitors on Friday, March 11th from Noon to 5PM.

I am looking forward to the opportunity to share  the work of our class; Special Topic in Sculpture: The Intimate Body, the Public Body. As the quarter continues I am more and more impressed with my student’s work that is deeply personal and politically and culturally relevant. Please come! Enjoy! And find us in room E-101!

Art 148: Thinking Through the Body

We just finished week 4 of the quarter in Special Topics in Sculpture or The Intimate Body, the Public Body at UC Santa Cruz. To begin the class my students and I did a brainstorm about the words, “Intimate” and “Public,” as well as, “The Body.” Below are some examples of what comes to mind when considering these terms and above is a message created between students that I recently discovered on the chalkboard in the classroom after assigning a project about identity. I am grateful to be thinking through these subjects with these students.



Art 148: The Intimate Body / The Public Body

I will be teaching an undergraduate sculpture class at UC Santa Cruz during the Winter 2011 quarter entitled, “The Intimate Body / The Public Body.” Below is the course description.

This course will consider the body as it exists within both an intimate and public sphere. Students will engage in a series of formal and conceptual projects that address topics such as body memory, anatomy, vulnerability, racial and gender identity, queerness, body technologies and how the body relates to and effect its environment. Through a series of presentations, readings, research, and studio work, students will be exposed to feminist and queer theories, contemporary art practices and histories related to sculpture and the body. Assignments will encourage an experimentation with materials, performance and collaboration

Image credit: Regina Jose Galindo, Saqueo. Photography by Marion Garcia.